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"Murphy was an optimist!"

Could you, would you save a life? March 8, 2006 6:33 am

Posted by Doug McCaughan in : Daily Life, Family, From the mouths of babes, News, Of Interest, Sarah
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Yesterday a 13 year old girl, Megan, on Sarah’s Bearden Middle School bus fell over with a heart attack. The girl beside the victom screamed. The bus stopped, students evacuated the bus, paramedics brought in a AED, rushed the girl away, and that’s all we know.

Poor Sarah. Bomb threats, lock downs, and possibly death. Too much reality for a 12 year old. The sad thing is Sarah keeps everything locked inside of her and I can’t get anything but stoic, short answers from her. I was the same way at her age and it pains me because I know that keeping things bottled up can only last so long and eventually it all has to come out; the longer she waits, the harder it will be to deal with the bottled up emotions. I bet she thinks she is being strong; strength would be talking. At least she has caught blog fever and perhaps we can communicate that way. She shared more information about the incident in her blog than I could have dragged out of her with any other means.

Taking advantage of the situation we had this dialog:

Dad: "So Sarah, would you have liked to known CPR to be able help?"
Sarah: "They taught us CPR at camp."
Dad: "So did you try to help?"
Sarah: "She didn’t need CPR. She needed those paddle thingys."
Dad: "An AED? A defibrillator?"
Dad takes a moment to explain CPR, the functions of the heart, lungs and brain, and why CPR saves lives until an AED can be brought on the scene.
Sarah glazes over and tunes Dad out.
Dad asks: "Would you like to be trained in CPR?"
Sarah, exasperated: " I don’t want to learn that medical stuff!"
Dad, starts to explain how she could have helped the girl today, or perhaps her grandparents or even parents.
*Ring ring*
Saved by the bell. The phone rings to end the conversation.

I have to say I found the conversation a little disheartening. More people should be trained with the American Red Cross.

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1. christine - March 8, 2006

I’m retrained every single year, but I often wonder if I would panic in the situation. We foster newborns, and I’m always picturing a worse-case-scenerio in hopes that if something DOES happen, I won’t just freeze up!

2. djuggler - March 8, 2006

I recently was close to a situation that required first aid. Can’t remember the details but it was unusual. Someone else managed the issue but I questioned, “What would I have done?” It’s time for another training.