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"Murphy was an optimist!"

N.E.W.S. times are a changin’ March 3, 2009 9:16 am

Posted by Doug McCaughan in : News, Of Interest
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N.E.W.S. – Notable Experience Was Scrutinized (or Noble Elitist Writers Soapbox)

What’s new in the news now? People are all a buzz…better…people are all a twitter about the death of the newspaper business. Ironically nicknamed deadwood, the printed word is dying. Newspapers are following the slide projector. Newspapers, once the cornerstone of public opinion, are struggling to re-establish themselves, figure out how to be profitable, and not get closed down. Newspapers used to be accepted as gospel. The tone of the printed word could set public opinion and decide political careers and was regarded by the public as "fair and unbiased" when in truth the newspaper is controlled by either an editor who can influence the tone set by the paper or corporation whose agenda may side with printing the opinion or running a story with a twist that brings in the most money. Pajamas Media argues that news should not be fair and balanced. So with papers dying, where will news come from? The Associated Press says to listen to the bloggers and the social media entrepreneurs. News is turning from the professional journalists who seek it out to the amateur writer who is experiencing the news as it happens. I want papers to succeed. Without the newspaper, society will crumble! How will we train our dogs? What will childhood be like without that disgusting smell of wet flour and strips of paper for sculpting? What will our parents stare blankly at while struggling to remember if this is their first or second bowl of bran cereal for the day?

N.E.W.S. – Now Everyone Writes Something

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1. Jack Lail - March 3, 2009

Not Everyone Wishes Success?

2. Doug McCaughan - March 3, 2009

I think this sentence is a bit key “News is turning from the professional journalists who seek it out to the amateur writer who is experiencing the news as it happens.”

It worries me that we may lose professional trained writers. If the newspapers and professional media sources don’t find a way to be viable, the future of news may look a bit like the Wild West. I hope people learn to check their sources!

In one regard we are moving forward with the way news is delivered almost as it happens but in another regard we stand the chance of losing the quality that comes with journalism training, an editor, and the wherewithal to not post gossip. Of course, I speak of myself as one of the untrained gossip mongers.