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Claiming your kidnapped child on your taxes

Folks, as tax season closes up many of us may rush through doing our taxes to meet the April 15th deadline. I wanted to point out a couple of details about your kidnapped child. Remember, if you plan on claiming your kidnapped child as a dependent, make sure that the kidnapper is not someone in your family or the child’s family (I’m not terribly clear on how the two are differentiated). Also, the child must have lived with you for at least one half of the portion of the year that they were actually with you. And remember, the child can no longer be claimed a dependent the year after they would have become 18 years of age because, well, they’re not with you and they are adults which makes them emancipated…they’ll claim themselves. For the actual IRS language, see Topic 357 – Tax Information for Parents of Kidnapped Children Last Reviewed or Updated: November 25, 2008. Those people at fairtax.org just haven’t thought about all the possibilities that Uncle Sam has already covered for us!

This post with apologies to anyone who actually has a kidnapped child.

5 thoughts on “Claiming your kidnapped child on your taxes

  1. Can you claim an extra deduction (calculated by square foot) if you provide the child a real room rather than simply a small box in the basement? I do this for my home office and only assume the same principle can be applied to kidnapped-child quarters, the kidnapping being something of a home business.

  2. Oops. I forgot to put that disclaimer up there about me not being an accountant or lawyer and, oh, how’s it go? But you know, your logic seems sound so I’d say go for it!

    I was wondering if the kidnapper gets to also claim the child as a dependent. Two people aren’t supposed to simultaneous claim the same person as a dependent.

  3. Ohmygoodness, that is awesome.

  4. This is morbid. NOT funny.

  5. Brit, going out on a limb here but I’m betting you aren’t a Monty Python fan either are you?

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